The Power of Ad Collaboration

Collaborative Marketing is the process of sharing or combining resources in order to increase leads, brand, and influence.

  • Consumers who saw brand and product-focused ad creatives were 102% more likely to purchase a particular product than those who only saw a product ad.
  • People who saw "Explore Now" brand ads and "Shop Now" ads that were focused on e-commerce were 75X more likely to convert than those who only saw the brand message.

When companies or internal departments come together with a common audience or goal, they can band together with videos, banner ads, and creatives. They can effectively incorporate any number of ways to create an influence and a presence that is greater than the sum of its parts.

Effective Storytelling

According to poet and writer, Gertrude Stein, "A rose is a rose is a rose." Another fallacy is that "A video is a video is a video." There can be different types of videos; each designed to appeal to different purchasers. In fact, anyone running video should be running two campaigns; the first one for branding, and the second for a sales campaign.

A branding video is essentially the look and feel of a brand. It's the personality -- the voice. The sales video is taking a product or a service and bringing it down to the consumer level; getting people to buy it. For instance, let's look at a travel business with dual video campaigns. Some of their ads highlight the comfort, beauty and relaxation that comes with vacationing, offering the chance to see what is out there in the world through travel. The other campaign is direct and says, "Hey, come book your vacation with us because we are not only the best and biggest, we also offer affordable deals and only quality hotels." When these two individual video campaigns merge they become even stronger--more powerful.

If you run and ad, you may attract, optimally, 60% of your customers, because we have learned that they aren't kidding when they say that you can't please everyone all the time. So what about the other 40%? What is going to get them over to your website to look into your business?

Even though you have done your split testing and have found that one great video, no matter how good you think it is, will NOT appeal to every viewer. You need to determine how to attract those that were not drawn to the initial video. A "salesy" video will turn some consumers off, but it does get right to the point of, "Hey, I'll bet you didn't know that you can travel to England for under $300 and oh, you need to let us book it for you because we are the biggest and the best -- period."

To counteract any negative attitude towards that direct style, there needs be other videos with a more passive feel. They should be lifestyle-based, like spending time with the family, enjoying the outdoors, or camping out by the beach. And, there is never any pressure to rent from the particular company placing the video, the ad just inspires you by showing images and videos of families hiking, driving along the coast, or laughing and singing while cruising down the road in an RV. Those "lifestyle" videos may appeal to some way more than the direct, factual sales video. The stats are usually about 50/50. But, you'll miss somebody from one, and get others with the others, so you need to keep two different creative campaigns running so that you can hone in on which ones resonate with whom.

Consistency, Media and Messaging

Consistency means that you have to be there in all the places, at all times, with the right messages to the right people. You can't run a little bit here and a little bit there; you must remain consistent -- and always in front of them. We know because we meticulously track and attribute each purchase from the initial impression to the conversion. Ideally, they'll see four or five different ads, including videos or banner ads, and doing Google searches. Be very aware though, that the minute you stop getting in front of your customers is the minute they'll stop remembering you.

Another thing that Genius Monkey has learned is that customers may not necessarily click on an ad, but that doesn't mean that they won't Google your company to read for themselves what you are all about. As a business industry, we need to stop trying to convince people to make decisions on our terms, and allow them to do it on theirs.

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